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Mountain Climbing

  • Rock Climbing Kids

    Posted on July 8, 2014 by olinselot

    Baby Climber This rock climbing baby is too cute.

    How early should you start letting kids explore their rock climbing skills? Most parents, at some point, will have a child that loves to climb everything in the house. The truth is, children are born to climb and it is a natural way for them to stay active and begin to develop strength and dexterity - so long as it's not the cookie jar they are climbing to!


    Toddler Climber Toddlers naturally know how to rock climb

    In home rock climbing walls can be a fun addition to any home. Crash pads can be placed at on the floor in case your rock climbing kids happen to take a fall, but ideally you should only place hand holds at a height that your child can safely climb without getting hurt. Supervision is not only a must it is a great way to bond with your children and develop relationships of trust. Plus, diaper climbing toddlers are just too cute!

    Little Girl Rock Climber This rock climbing little girl has a bright healthy future

    If you safely let your children climb you will be shocked and inspired at how fearless and skilled they can be. You can give them a new hobby and positively impact their life, health, and love of the outdoors. Whether it is a climbing wall in the garage, or a local rock climbing hot spot, always put safety first and keep a smile on your face.

    This post was posted in Mountain Climbing, Outdoor Gear, Uncategorized and was tagged with children, kids, rock climbing

  • Long Underwear from Long Ago

    Posted on December 9, 2013 by olinselot

    Primitive Layering
    Around the year 3300 BC, a primitive man now known as Otzi, or the "Iceman", lived among the mountains near Italy. In 1991 the preserved body of Otzi was discovered mostly frozen in a high ice form. What was most exciting was that most of his clothing and survival gear were still intact.

    OtziOtzi wore a fur hat made of bear hide, a cloak of woven grass reeds, a belt of calf leather, bear skin shoes, and most importantly - long underwear made of goat skin wool. Long before recorded history, early humans lived and thrived based upon their ability to endure the environment. The tools they created and and materials they formed into their clothing were a serious matter.

    One of the most enlightening parts of Otzi's attire was his long underwear. Made from goat skin, the woolen hide provided him insulation from the snow and wind. In modern times we have the advantage of high performance synthetic thermals and time tested merino wool long underwear. We can learn from the ancient wisdom of primitive man and combine it with modern technical advancements.

    Premium PerformancePremium Performance long underwear has been crafted from a blend of 85% polyester and 15% spandex. Designed to cut through the cold and wind, Premium Performance long underwear provides maximum comfort and mobility. It also benefits from antimicrobial odor control; a benefit that probably would have been greatly appreciated by Otzi's friends.

    If you are more keen on natural and renewable materials, then premium merino wool long underwear is for you. If Otzi had premium grade merino wool thermals he would have been able to stay dry, keep warm, move faster, and smell better. Ancient wisdom still applies when you are venturing into the outdoors. Learn from the lessons of the past and clothe yourselves to thrive.

    This post was posted in Base Layer, Clothing Layers, Hiking, Merino Wool, Merino Wool, Mountain Climbing, Outdoor Gear, Polypropylene Underwear, Stay Dry, Thermal Underwear, Winter Blizzard and was tagged with base layers, Iceman, layerig, long underwear, merino wool, Oetzi, Otzi, premium performance, thermal underwear

  • Check out 5 awesome gift ideas under $25!

    Posted on November 9, 2013 by olinselot


    firstaidkit Every camping family needs an adventure medical kit and the Steelhead Sportsman Quick Access First Aid Kit is perfect to carry along on any outing. Inside the DryFlex waterproof bag you will find a supply of treatment that is perfect to carry along in your day pack. The kit has treatment for wounds, bleeding, blister and burns, fracture and sprains, medication, and much more. This is the perfect gift price of $25 for any friend or family member!




    This adorable little kettle is perfect for the backpacking family, or those who like to pack light! The Optimus Ultra-Light Terra Kettle holds about three cups of liquid, it's made of anodized aluminum making it very light at 5.4 ounces. Gift price of $19.99! Check it out!





    Light My Fire Army Grade FireSteel 2.0® Fire Starter is a really unique gift! It is an improved striker which makes it easier to build fires in any weather! The built in emergency whistle makes this a really sweet gift for $22.99! Stuff this little guy in their stocking...they will love it!




    solocooksetOptimus Ultra-Light Terra Solo Cookset is a handy gift this year. It is made from ultralight hard anodized aluminum, and it comes with a stewing pot with a pour spout, and measuring marks. The frying pan can also double as a lid.



    dualheadlampThis Black Diamond 35 Lumen Dual LED Headlamp is a fun stocking stuffer! These headlamps come in five different colors, so everyone in the family can have their own!



    Remember that will price match! Happy shopping!

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    This post was posted in Cooking and Fire, Hiking, Mountain Climbing, Outdoor Gear, Uncategorized and was tagged with camp, camping family, christmas gifts, family, gift ideas, gift ideas under $25, gift ideas under 20, gifts for him, holiday gifts 2013, outdoor gift ideas, outersports,

  • Proper Hydration

    Posted on August 15, 2013 by olinselot

    How Much Water

    Everyone knows that staying hydrated is important for personal health and safety. Whether you are playing sports, hiking, camping, hunting, or any physical activity – it is essential that you maintain proper hydration.

    But how much water are you supposed to drink? Well that depends on the amount of physical exercise, your environment, and specific health conditions. The Institute of Medicine has determined that the adequate intake for men is roughly 13 cups – and for women 9 cups – of fluid per day. You should always account for the type of activities you’ll be doing as well as variable such as temperature.

    Nathan Vapor Shot

    Staying safely hydrated is more than simply drinking enough water. Make sure to supplement your water with electrolytes if it is especially hot or your activities are strenuous. Also, if you are in the outdoors, it is important to properly filter and sometimes boil any water from natural streams or rivers. This prevents parasites and illness that can lead to serious health complications and even death.

    Many athletes and outdoors enthusiasts choose not to carry water with them because the bottles are not ergonomic, or they don’t fit well inside or on their pack. This is unwise. There are multiple hydration options that have been specifically designed for athletes and outdoorsmen. At you can find many options for both water filtration and functional hydration bottles and packs to fit your specific needs.

    This post was posted in Hiking, Mountain Climbing, Outdoor Gear and was tagged with bottles, hydration, packs, proper hydration, water bottles, water filters, water filtration

  • Wildcat Mountain

    Posted on August 5, 2013 by olinselot

    Danny RestingThe White Mountains are widely recognized as the most challenging part of the Appalachian Trail. In the heart of the range stands Wildcat Mountain. Wildcat Mountain is one of the most well known ski resorts in New England. Its summit reaches 4,305 feet with sides consisting of ragged boulders and advanced terrain. Wounded soldier Danny Kennedy recently stood at the base of this mountain with a difficult decision to make. Should he risk severe injury by attempting to climb the mountain with only one good arm or do what most do and ride to the top on the provided gondola?

    GondolaMost thru hikers opt out of the physical challenge and choose instead to ride one of the resorts gondolas to the top. They see the climb ahead and fear either injury or possible death from a slip or fall. Danny Kennedy is not your average hiker! Danny was given the choice to ride the gondola or to attempt the harrowing climb on his own. Without hesitation Danny chose to climb the mountain in spite of his debilitating injuries as a wounded veteran. We are thrilled that he not only made it to the top but that he made it look so easy.
    Wildcat Climb
    During a critical section of the climb Danny turned on a GoPro camera. The following video gives you a first person perspective of what this experience was like for him. Hand over hand, boulder over boulder, he climbs to one of the most scenic views we've seen along the Appalachian Trail so far.

    This post was posted in Hiking, Mountain Climbing, Outdoor Gear, Uncategorized, Wounded Soldiers and was tagged with appalachian trail, Backpacking, Danny Kennedy, hiking, thru hiking, Wildcat, Wildcat Mountain, wounded soldier

  • Wounded Soldier - Reaching the Summit of Mt. Washington

    Posted on July 29, 2013 by olinselot

    Mt Washington Summit
    Danny Kennedy has been crossing over mountain ranges, surviving flooded trails, and persisting when others thought he would fail. He has made it out of the state of Maine and into New Hampshire. What is really remarkable is his determination to actually complete the trail the way the path was designed. While others go around the Mahoosuc Notch - Danny goes directly through it.

    Coming soon is more images and footage of these incredible accomplishments of Danny doing things that others try to go around. Until then, check out this awesome time lapse footage of Bill and Danny scouting out the summit of Mt. Washington:

    This post was posted in Hiking, Mountain Climbing, Outdoor Gear, Uncategorized, Wounded Soldiers and was tagged with appalachian trail, camp gear, Danny Kennedy, hiking, Mahoosuc Notch, Mt. Washington, wounded soldier

  • Crossing the Bemis Range - Appalachian Trail

    Posted on July 19, 2013 by olinselot

    They told me I'd never walk again
    Danny Kennedy has been keeping up an impressively fast pace as he works his way down the Appalachian Trail. Danny passed through Andover, Maine where he hiked for ten miles. Danny is still in great spirits as he has now passed over Moody Mountain, Sawyer Notch, and Wyman Mountain.

    hiking awayDanny has continued another 20 miles down the trail. Facing him next is the most difficult, but reportedly most fun, part of the hike known as the Mahoosuc Notch. After he completes this rugged portion of the trail Bill will hook up with him again in Gorham, NH during a resupply stop.


    This post was posted in Hiking, Mountain Climbing, Outdoor Gear, Uncategorized, Wounded Soldiers and was tagged with appalachian trail, camping, Danny Kennedy, hike, hiking, thru hiking, wounded soldier

  • Primus Power Cooking

    Posted on July 15, 2013 by olinselot

    Original PrimusIt was a time for change. 1892 marked the first year in America when Ellis Island would actually begin to accommodate immigrants to the United States. The first rules of a new game called basketball would be published by James Naismith. A new company was formed called General Electric. Thomas Edison would patent the first two-way telegraph device. In a Stockholm, Sweden a factory worker named Frans Wilhelm Lindqvist would create a device that would reach across the globe to make countless lives better. He developed the first soot free stove called the Primus.

    Original Primus DesignVery few products associated with hiking and camping have stood the test of time like the Primus Stove System. When looking at a modern EtaSolo or Omni-Fuel stove you'd think they came from another planet with their advanced design and ruggedly refined features. But the Primus Power Cooking system gets its roots from an era when products were built to last. The original Primus Stove was made of brass, was fueled by kerosene, and used an innovative pressure system to create a clean burning flame. Before its creation you relied upon a standard oil and wick lamp which was inefficient and left black soot on the walls and ceiling wherever it was left.

    Omni Fuel SystemToday Primus is not only still in operation, but has created a stove that can take almost any type of fuel making the Omni Fuel the perfect stove whether you need it for hiking the Appalachian Trail, winter hiking or just for emergency preparedness. To make it even better, Omni-Fuel has a very exact flame control as well as jet nipples to make it easy to simmer, boil, or whatever you need. With the fuel source being external to the burner you have greater flexibility in packing and storage as well as making it simple to replace and keep cooking even when in use. You can fill the bottle with gasoline, diesel, kerosene, jet fuel, LP Gas or any other combustible fuel source that fits your needs.

    Eta Solo Primus has also developed a cook system that streamlines the fuel, flame, and cooking cup/pot into a lightweight user friendly system. The EtaSolo by Primus is a compact and lightweight pot and stove that runs on ISO/Butane and can be used for boiling water, cooking your dehydrated or freeze dried meals to cooking the fish or small game you catch on the trail. Boiling water is fast and easy with the Quick-Click locking system and the Piezo ignition, just one click starts your stove, and the water will be ready in just a couple of minutes. You don’t need to worry about the system tipping over even in windy conditions this system is stable and the wrap around heat resistant cover allows you to comfortably grab onto the pot while cooking.

    There are a variety of other fantastic Primus product now available in our new hiking and camping section of our Outersports online store. You can't always trust the weather to keep your trail side wood dry and accessible. It is always a good plan to take a reliable Primus system into the outdoors.

    This post was posted in Cooking and Fire, Hiking, Mountain Climbing, Outdoor Gear and was tagged with camp gear, camping, camping gear, cooking, EtaSolo, fire, fire starting, hiking, hiking gear, Omni-Fuel, primus, primus stove

  • Darwin's Rules for the Outdoors

    Posted on July 8, 2013 by olinselot

    Mother Nature can be brutal, but somehow throughout thousands of years we homo-sapiens have endured. Through the process of natural selection the strongest have survived while the weakest perish under the burden of their own flaws. Survival of the fittest!

    Darwin and SpencerCharles Darwin typically gets credited with that phrase, "Survival of the Fittest", but it was actually Herbert Spencer who coined it in 1864. What might be more surprising is that our modern concept of the "fittest" is far from it's original meaning. Darwin and Spencer both used the term to indicate a species ability to reproduce effectively and it had very little to do with a species being bigger, faster, or stronger than another. So, now you know why the human population continues to grow and spread in spite of many of us not necessarily being bigger, faster, or stronger than the last generation. Any species that is efficient at reproduction in its adapted environment is thereby "Fit" enough to survive. What does this mean? It means you and I are not necessarily physically superior to anything else on the planet and therefore have no special get out of danger free card.

    Every year and every season thousands of people wander into the wilderness under the delusion that they are bigger, faster, smarter and stronger than all other species around them. They try to pet the buffalo, ride the bear, eat the red berries, and drink from the "fresh" spring creek. They serve as shining examples to the rest of us as they fly, crawl, drift and drag through mother nature.

    For those brave individuals I present Darwin's Rules for the Outdoors:

    Safety Tip #1 - Never Pick Up Hitch Hiking Bears. In other words don't take animals home with you. Transporting wild animals is not only illegal it's highly dangerous. As much as you love that little baby fox that looks helpless on the side of the road you should never try to pick it up and take it home.
    Don't Take Animals Home







    Safety Tip #2 - Warnings Aren't Optional. Take for example this pleasant looking quarry lake near Harpur Hill in Buxton. Despite the highly visible warning signs posted everywhere swimmers, including children, were continually swimming in the lake. The toxic acid levels in the water were so dangerous that it was literally safer to swim in a lake of pure liquid bleach than what they were dunking into. The poisonous waters were a deadly combination of chemicals and rubbish that deceived many swimmers because of the beautiful aqua blue color of the water. Local authorities have since dyed the water black to discourage swimming. The moral of the story is that just because it looks safe you should ALWAYS obey the warning signs.
    Obey the Warning Signs







    Safety Tip #3 - Veggies Aren't Always Good For You. Every year hikers and campers put themselves in danger by touching, eating, climbing, and interacting with vegetation they aren't familiar with. Take the time to study the local plant life before making a salad or using it to clean up after a bathroom break. Most of what you have in your cupboards has been highly adapted for human consumption. Nature isn't that convenient. If you aren't trained in the vegetation and its uses then it's probably best to leave it alone.
    Veggies aren't always Good







    Safety Tip #4 - Don't Pet Cute and Fuzzies. When people go into the outdoors they often think that wild animals are harmless so long as they aren't carnivores. They see the furry buffalo and think it's docile like a cow. Well, just talk to a local cattle rancher and they'll tell you how safe even a domesticated cow can be. Aside from the cute and fuzzy animals you may encounter there are the small and nasty variety that should be considered. Mosquitoes alone are responsible for almost 3 million deaths in the world every year. In the United States over 50 people per year die from bee and wasp stings. At least 31 people per year, on average, are killed by their household dog! So, be smart and don't pet the wild ones!
    Don't Pet Wild Animals







    Safety Tip #5 - Mushrooms Aren't Safe. Especially Flaming Gasoline Mushrooms. Thanks to Smokey the Bear, most people are aware of the dangers of forest fires. What goes more unnoticed are the countless amount of preventable injuries and deaths that occur when people don't respect small fires. Tossing foreign objects into campfires is a recipe for disaster. You may not be the type to toss a jug of gasoline into the flames, but a mere unopened can of soup can become a flaming grenade of red hot shrapnel waiting to explode. Don't play with fire, but also don't underestimate it.
    Don't Play with FIre










    Safety Tip #6 - You Aren't a Ninja. Falling deaths and injuries are one of the most common accidents in the outdoors. A simple hop from on boulder to another can lead to a serious mechanical injury. Spraining a toe from a seemingly easy jump across a creek could leave you stranded overnight without proper gear. Be honest with yourself and know your physical limitations. Take a moment to find a safe way across or down.
    You Aren't a Ninja

    This post was posted in Hiking, Mountain Climbing, Outdoor Gear, Uncategorized and was tagged with climbing, darwin, darwin awards, darwin's rules for the outdoors, emergency, hiking, safety, swimming, tips

  • Hiking with Gratitude

    Posted on June 29, 2013 by olinselot

    Danny helps another hikerPresident John F. Kennedy once said "As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them." Nathan Hunt and Danny Kennedy, wounded soldiers hiking the Appalachian Trail, have had many people and organizations step forward to help them. What is most inspiring his how many people they have uplifted and helped along the way as well. They aren't just hiking. They are hiking with gratitude.

    In just one example, during a resupply stop in Maine, Danny was able to put his medical training to good use. He repaired the damaged toe of another hiker who was in need of help. In the following video you'll see how quick Nate and Danny are to thank and uplift everyone they meet along the way.

    Although Nathan had to return home to recover from heat exposure, he is working hard to recover so he can join Danny or take on the trail in the future.

    This post was posted in Base Layer, Clothing Layers, Hiking, Merino Wool, Mountain Climbing, Outdoor Gear, Thermal Underwear, Uncategorized, Wounded Soldiers and was tagged with appalachian trail, base layers, hiking, hiking with gratitude, merino wool, outoor gear, thru hiking, video, wounded soldiers, wounded vet

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